Cherokee Slam Bid To Take Opioid Suit To Federal Court

Cherokee Slam Bid To Take Opioid Suit To Federal Court

Law360, By Andrew Westney

The Cherokee Nation on Wednesday assailed McKesson Corp.'s effort to transfer from Oklahoma state court to federal court the tribe’s suit against the company and other major retail pharmacies and drug distributors for their alleged role in an explosion of opioid abuse among tribe members, saying McKesson wants to delay facing the tribe’s claims.

In Opioid Battle, Cherokee Want Their Day in Tribal Court

In Opioid Battle, Cherokee Want Their Day in Tribal Court

The New York Times, By Jan Hoffman

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Cherokee children were disappearing.

At weekly staff meetings, Todd Hembree, the attorney general of the Cherokee Nation, kept hearing about babies in opioid withdrawal and youngsters with addicted parents, all being removed from families. The crush on the foster care system was so great that the unthinkable had become inevitable: 70 percent of the Cherokee foster children in Oklahoma had to be placed in the homes of non-Indians.

‘We feel like our system was hijacked’: DEA agents say a huge opioid case ended in a whimper

‘We feel like our system was hijacked’: DEA agents say a huge opioid case ended in a whimper

The Washington Post, By Lenny Bernstein and Scott Higham

After two years of painstaking investigation, David Schiller and the rest of the Drug Enforcement Administration team he supervised were ready to move on the biggest opioid distribution case in U.S. history.

Native Americans, among the most harmed by the opioid epidemic, are often left out of conversation

Native Americans, among the most harmed by the opioid epidemic, are often left out of conversation

The Washington Post, by Eugene Scott

Some Native American groups, such as the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, are taking the fight against the opioid epidemic into their own hands by suing companies that they believe flooded their communities with opioids.

The Drug Industry’s Triumph Over the DEA

The Drug Industry’s Triumph Over the DEA

The Washington Post, by Scott Higham & Lenny Bernstein

In April 2016, at the height of the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history, Congress effectively stripped the Drug Enforcement Administration of its most potent weapon against large drug companies suspected of spilling prescription narcotics onto the nation’s streets.By then, the opioid war had claimed 200,000 lives, more than three times the number of U.S. military deaths in the Vietnam War. Overdose deaths continue to rise. There is no end in sight.

Ex-DEA agent: Opioid crisis fueled by drug industry and Congress

Ex-DEA agent: Opioid crisis fueled by drug industry and Congress

60 Minutes, by Bill Whitaker

In the midst of the worst drug epidemic in American history, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's ability to keep addictive opioids off U.S. streets was derailed -- that according to Joe Rannazzisi, one of the most important whistleblowers ever interviewed by 60 Minutes.

Drug Distributors Fall Ahead of ‘60 Minutes’ Report on Opioid Crisis

Drug Distributors Fall Ahead of ‘60 Minutes’ Report on Opioid Crisis

Bloomberg, by Michelle Cortez

Shares of U.S. drug distributors fell Friday ahead of a “60 Minutes” television news report examining the role the industry played in the opioid epidemic that’s sweeping the nation. The six-month joint investigation with the Washington Post, scheduled to air on CBS on Sunday, details how the Drug Enforcement Administration’s efforts to address the outbreak that has led to thousands of overdose deaths was undermined and derailed. 

Cherokee Nation Sues Drug Firms, Retailers for Flooding Communities with Opioids

Cherokee Nation Sues Drug Firms, Retailers for Flooding Communities with Opioids

The Washington Post, by Scott Higham & Lenny Bernstein

Lawyers for the Cherokee Nation opened a new line of attack against the pharmaceutical industry Thursday, filing a lawsuit in tribal court that accuses the nation’s six top drug distributors and pharmacies of flooding communities in Oklahoma with hundreds of millions of highly addictive pain pills. Read More

Battling addiction in the Cherokee Nation

Battling addiction in the Cherokee Nation

The Hill, by Nikki Baker-Limore

I see the impact of the opioid epidemic on the Cherokee Nation through a heartbreaking lens—the eyes of our Cherokee children born addicted. Every month, I see numerous babies fighting for their life as they begin the torturous process of opioid withdrawal — bodies shaking, hearts racing, crying inconsolably, and left with permanent developmental delays.

Combatting the Opioid Crisis at its Source

Combatting the Opioid Crisis at its Source

Huffington Post, by Todd Hembree
In the Cherokee Nation, where I serve as Attorney General, I have seen the opioid crisis worsen every year, breaking up more families and taking more lives, as the prescription opioid industry increased its profits by flooding our community with more and more lethal painkillers.

Drug Crisis Rattles Cherokee Nation, With More Children Born Addicted to Opioids and Moved into Foster Homes

Drug Crisis Rattles Cherokee Nation, With More Children Born Addicted to Opioids and Moved into Foster Homes

Newsweek, by Josh Saul

The number of prescription opioids sold on Cherokee National tribal lands is even higher than previously thought, and the resulting addictions are tearing families apart and threatening the existence of the tribe. Almost 90 million opioid pills were dispensed in the 14 Oklahoma counties that make up the Cherokee Nation’s land last year, which means about 96 pills were sold to each adult.